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Optometry Conferences and Trade Shows: My First Hand Experience and Advice

Posted by on Sep 8, 2014 in Blogs | 1 comment

Over the last 2 years, I’ve had the privilege of attending Optometry’s Meeting (OM) in Chicago and San Diego, Vision Expo East (VEE) in New York, Vision Expo West (VEW) in Vegas, the South Eastern Congress of Optometry (SECO) in Atlanta and the Congressional Advocacy Conference (CAC) in Washington, D.C. A lot of students don’t give much thought or are really aware of the opportunity to attend these hugely beneficial conferences. Here’s my take on why you should attend a few conferences as an optometry student, and how each one is different.VEE

How these conferences work:

You can usually find a decent deal on registration and hotel as long as you start planning early. The centerpiece of each conference is usually the exhibit hall and features frame companies, equipment dealers, websites, specialty products, and more. Throughout the show, there is a wide variety of continuing education courses–FREE for students–on topics such as clinical advice to business and marketing. There are also various events and parties to attend, some educational with a complimentary lunch/dinner and networking included.

Optometry’s Meeting

This is the meeting that is most synonymous with students, which is what sets it apart from the others. It’s held in a different city each year. It has events such as the student bowlpopular Student Bowl, and some great parties at night. It also has many student-geared programs and CE’s. That being said, the size and variety of the exhibit hall is on the small side. I feel the attendance of optometrists (and your opportunity for casual conversations and encounters walking around the exhibit hall floor, which is important for making connections and networking) is low compared to other conferences. I would still try to attend this conference every year, as it is a very fun trip and a chance to meet students from other schools and bond more with your classmates. As a side note: don’t underestimate the importance of meeting other students. You get a different view on optometry school and they may have connections or plans once they graduate, and could be looking for someone to join them.

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Healthy Body, Healthy Mind

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind

Posted by on May 23, 2014 in Blogs | 2 comments

Since arriving at ICO in 2012, I’ve tried to improve my study habits and general approach to student life. I was a model of poor health during my first year. My extreme commute and my time-consuming responsibilities as senior editor of OptometryStudents.com took their toll. But I made some adjustments, and now I feel mentally sharper and have more energy. Here are some tips that have helped me be successful in my classes and stay healthy–maybe some of these can work for you, too.

Treat your lectures as if you have an exam on that exact material the next day
Don’t waste your time half-listening in class, “multitasking” by scrolling through Facebook or Snapchat on your phone. Imagine that you’ll be performing the clinical procedure you’re learning about later that day, and the patient’s sight depends on YOU. If you can hang on to every word your professor says, you’ll save tons of time studying later on. (Sorry for not heeding this advice sooner, Dr. Goodfellow!)

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Lab and Clinic Etiquette

Lab and Clinic Etiquette

Posted by on Jan 17, 2014 in Blogs | 0 comments

Half way through our second year, the class of 2016 has had plenty of experience in lab. By now, we’re all comfortable with practically pressing our faces together for Direct Ophthalmoscopy, or contorting the faces of our patients to get a good look for BIO. I’d like to give a few pointers on simple etiquette in lab that we’ve all learned since first year. Some of this may seem obvious, but as we get more comfortable and get into a routine, we often fall into bad habits unconsciously. On top of that, some people may not feel comfortable correcting you. This makes it even worse, because as you cross over and become an OD, these habits stick with you and could affect your patients’ experience, and determine whether or not they return or find somewhere else to go.

Quick disclaimer: I’m not saying I’ve necessarily experienced every item on this list this first hand. Some of this comes from joking around with classmates, casual conversation or just common sense.

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Same Quarter, Different Year

Same Quarter, Different Year

Posted by on Dec 2, 2013 in Blogs | 3 comments

What a difference a year makes. First quarter wrapped up a month ago, and I think all my classmates would agree that first quarter of second year is a walk in the park compared to first quarter of first year. Last quarter, as I walked through the library, I noticed first year students hunched over those dreaded Human Anatomy notes, 20 different colors highlighting the hundreds of tiny anatomical parts we needed to memorize. It was a bittersweet moment: I felt the pain of those first years trying to remember which nerves at the upper thyroid cartilage would be affected by damage to the right side of the throat. But I also rejoiced in the knowledge that I’d never have to relive the rude awakening most of them were experiencing. Spare time was a luxury rarely afforded last year. This year, believe it or not, I’ve actually been able to work out regularly and get more than five hours of sleep a night.

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My Marathon Commute

My Marathon Commute

Posted by on Nov 14, 2013 in Blogs | 2 comments

ICO commuteMy commute is kind of crazy: Door-to-door roundtrip, it takes five hours. Some days I really don’t mind it, others I feel I could go off the deep end like Michael Douglas in Falling Down. Here’s a quick synopsis of my everyday journey:

-up at 5:30 a.m., pulling out of my driveway by 6.

-frantic 5-10 minute drive to get to the Metra train station in Kenosha, Wis., praying to hit every green light and hoping for no cops with speed guns along the way. Try to find a close parking spot at the train station. Jump out of the car, grab my backpack and lunch, and do the awkward shuffle/run with my backpack swaying from side to side, and hop on the Metra by 6:15 a.m.

-an hour-and-a-half train ride where it’s crucial to be productive. I create my own little work space in the cramped seat: computer open, notes propped up, pen, phone, water bottle and snack by my side. Arrive at Ogilvy Station in downtown Chicago by 7:45 a.m.

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