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Infant Eye Exams

Infant Eye Exams

Posted by on Nov 21, 2014 in Blogs | 2 comments

In our Vision Science class during first year, Dr. Pang and Dr. Allison stopped by and perform eye exams on our professor’s three young grandchildren.

For a baby, the eye exam starts the moment the doctor walks into the room: The clinician pays close attention to the baby, watching the child as they look at the doctor, look at their parents, shift their gaze around the room, etc. Even at three months of age, a baby should be able to track an object up to 10 inches from them; if not, there may be an indication of a neurological deficiency. The best time to do an infant eye exam is first thing in the morning, when the baby is wide awake, fed and ready for their day.

Visual attention is an important cue and the baby should be able to follow an object or person moving around the room. In our class, the babies were six months and six weeks of age, and I can imagine that their attention was difficult to monitor with all the faces in the class looking at them. Watching the baby track an object, such as a bottle or rattle, is very important. Because a baby is a non-verbal patient at this point, the parents will become the key source of information and will usually notice if something seems not quite right; most commonly they’ll notice either an eye turn, or that the eyes aren’t tracking objects well.

Teller acuity cards, www.stereooptical.com

Teller acuity cards, www.stereooptical.com

How a baby’s vision quality is assessed
The traditional procedures for determining visual acuity can’t be used on a baby for obvious reasons–they can’t exactly tell you which one is better? One or two? An interesting way the profession has gotten around this is through the use of Teller acuity cards. The card has two sections: One section has a striped pattern, known as gratings, that varies from card to card; the other section is a uniform gray. Between the sections is a peephole that the clinician can use to view the baby’s response to the card, while keeping their face hidden. If the baby spends more time looking at the gratings than the uniform gray, that means they can visually detect the pattern presented to them.

Once it’s determined the baby is looking at the gratings, the clinician will move on to a finer grating, to determine the limits of acuity. As soon as the baby chooses to look at the uniform gray instead of the gratings, we know it has gone beyond the limits of their detection. A similar technique for measuring acuity in infants is using LEA paddles, which work the same way as the Teller cards; the difference is that Teller cards hide your face. A baby will always choose to look at a face over anything else because it is much more interesting to them–it’s one of the obstacles in doing infant eye exams.

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PAP and the Holy Grail

PAP and the Holy Grail

Posted by on Apr 24, 2014 in Blogs | 0 comments

A major deciding factor for me in choosing ICO is that clinical experience begins in the very first quarter. In the first year, this experience–all of it in ICO’s clinic, the Illinois Eye Institute–is called the Patient Advocate Program. During first quarter, our PAP experience includes familiarizing ourselves with the layout of the IEI, getting an eye exam and writing a report based on our own experience as a patient.

The eye exams at the IEI probably aren’t like others you’ve had. Before coming to ICO, I’d arrive at the clinic and a technician would perform most of the entrance tests like lensometry, OCT, fundus pictures, keratometry, autorefraction and tonometry. All of these tests would be performed with automated machinery, and they’d be completed in about 20 minutes. I’d then be directed to a waiting area, where I’d sit for 10 minutes or so. Then the doctor would see me for another 20 minutes. I’d be in and out within an hour, and I was never dilated.

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Pencil Crayons and Other Memorization Tools

Posted by on Mar 21, 2014 in Blogs | 0 comments

As my fellow blogger Fatima has noted, spring quarter is upon us. It’s crazy to think that in two months I’ll be able to call myself a “second year,” and it makes me realize how fast the the school year as flown by. I’m already counting down to summer–our first and only summer off during our time at ICO.

We’re a four weeks in, and at about this time each quarter I find myself getting extremely overwhelmed with the course load. The amount of work we have seems unmanageable until I’ve gotten a few exams under my belt. Fortunately, we now only have two exams per week instead of three, as in the previous two quarters. Still, I already feel exhausted and ready for the next break (despite the fact that our last break ended only a month ago). Unsurprisingly, some of my classmates have made fun of me for this.

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Chicago Restaurants: Michigan Avenue Edition

Chicago Restaurants: Michigan Avenue Edition

Posted by on Feb 27, 2014 in Blogs | 0 comments

Chicago’s Michigan Avenue is famously home to the Magnificent Mile, the city’s toniest shopping strip. Go five miles south on Michigan and you’ll find ICO. Something else you’ll find: a plethora of great restaurants. Below, four of my favorite dining experiences on the Windy City’s best-known street.

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My highlight of 2014 so far was a trip to Waffles! It’s a delicious retro-style diner just over two miles from campus in the South Loop. From campus, hop on the #4 bus headed north and you shall be there in about five to 10 minutes, closer to five. I ordered the red velvet waffles (served with an unbelievably good whipped cream cheese topping), and my friend had the Mexican chocolate waffles. Unfortunately I didn’t ask my friend for a bite so I can’t tell you how the Mexican chocolate waffles tasted, but it’s worth a trip back for the red velvet waffles alone! When I went on a recent Saturday morning, there was no wait–a nice surprise. And, the service was great.

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RC Life

RC Life

Posted by on Dec 10, 2013 in Blogs | 0 comments

When you’re accepted to ICO, the question of whether or not to live in the Residential Complex–the RC–comes up. There are numerous benefits to living in the RC, and there are many reasons why one would choose not to. At this point, I myself am very glad that I opted to live there!

Living in the RC is a very unique experience and I would encourage all new students to partake in this experience to enjoy the benefits of living right across the street from school. I think it’s an especially great experience for first years. The convenience of having the college and all of its amenities right next door is absolutely invaluable; in your first year of optometry school when you are extremely busy (you can’t imagine how busy you will be) you will have the fitness center, cafeteria, library and countless cozy study areas just two minutes away. Additionally, there are  many upperclassmen willing to lend an ear to help you get through the stressful times, or to simply provide tutoring or test preparation advice.

For me, coming from Canada and never having been away from home, it was nice to know that I had a place to live already lined up before getting here. I can’t imagine how stressful it would have been knowing that I still had to find an acceptable place to live before classes started. This really helped with adapting to life in a completely new city, adjusting to optometry school expectations, and meeting and forming friendships with many, many new people.

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